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BHP : NEWS RELEASE (Form 6-K)

09/15/2021 | 06:22am

NEWS RELEASE

Release Time IMMEDIATE
Date 15 September 2021
Release Number 22/21

Jansen briefing

BHP will be hosting an investor and analyst briefing today on the Jansen project.

A copy of the presentation is attached.

The presentation will be available on BHP's website at: https://www.bhp.com/investors/presentations-events/presentations-and-briefings

An archive of the webcast will be made available shortly after the event.

Further information on BHP can be found at: bhp.com

Authorised for lodgement by:

Stefanie Wilkinson

Group Company Secretary

Media Relations Investor Relations
Email: media.relations@bhp.com Email: investor.relations@bhp.com
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Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021

Disclaimer Forward-looking statements This presentation contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding: trends in commodity prices and currency exchange rates; demand for commodities; production forecasts; plans, strategies and objectives of management; assumed long-term scenarios; potential global responses to climate change; the potential effect of possible future events on the value of the BHP portfolio; closure or divestment of certain assets, operations or facilities (including associated costs); anticipated production or construction commencement dates; capital costs and scheduling; operating costs and shortages of materials and skilled employees; anticipated productive lives of projects, mines and facilities; provisions and contingent liabilities; and tax and regulatory developments. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of terminology, including, but not limited to, 'intend', 'aim', 'project', 'anticipate', 'estimate', 'plan', 'believe', 'expect', 'may', 'should', 'will', 'would', 'continue', 'annualised' or similar words. These statements discuss future expectations concerning the results of assets or financial conditions, or provide other forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements are based on the information available as at the date of this presentation and/or the date of the Group's planning processes or scenario analysis processes. There are inherent limitations with scenario analysis and it is difficult to predict which, if any, of the scenarios might eventuate. Scenarios do not constitute definitive outcomes for us. Scenario analysis relies on assumptions that may or may not be, or prove to be, correct and may or may not eventuate, and scenarios may be impacted by additional factors to the assumptions disclosed. Additionally, forward-looking statements are not guarantees or predictions of future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond our control, and which may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the statements contained in this presentation. BHP cautions against reliance on any forward-looking statements or guidance, particularly in light of the current economic climate and the significant volatility, uncertainty and disruption arising in connection with COVID-19. For example, our future revenues from our assets, projects or mines described in this release will be based, in part, upon the market price of the minerals, metals or petroleum produced, which may vary significantly from current levels. These variations, if materially adverse, may affect the timing or the feasibility of the development of a particular project, the expansion of certain facilities or mines, or the continuation of existing assets. Other factors that may affect the actual construction or production commencement dates, costs or production output and anticipated lives of assets, mines or facilities include our ability to profitably produce and transport the minerals, petroleum and/or metals extracted to applicable markets; the impact of foreign currency exchange rates on the market prices of the minerals, petroleum or metals we produce; activities of government authorities in the countries where we sell our products and in the countries where we are exploring or developing projects, facilities or mines, including increases in taxes; changes in environmental and other regulations; the duration and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on our business; political uncertainty; labour unrest; and other factors identified in the risk factors discussed in BHP's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the 'SEC') (including in Annual Reports on Form 20-F) which are available on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Except as required by applicable regulations or by law, BHP does not undertake to publicly update or review any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information or future events. Past performance cannot be relied on as a guide to future performance. BHP Climate Change Report 2020 This presentation should be read in conjunction with the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 available at bhp.com. Some of the information in this presentation provides a concise overview of certain aspects of that Report and may omit information, analysis and assumptions and, accordingly, BHP cautions readers from relying on that information in this presentation in isolation. Presentation of data Numbers presented may not add up precisely to the totals provided due to rounding. No offer of securities Nothing in this presentation should be construed as either an offer or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell any securities, or a solicitation of any vote or approval, in any jurisdiction, or be treated or relied upon as a recommendation or advice by BHP. No offer of securities shall be made in the United States absent registration under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or pursuant to an exemption from, or in a transaction not subject to, such registration requirements. Reliance on third party information The views expressed in this presentation contain information that has been derived from publicly available sources that have not been independently verified. No representation or warranty is made as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the information. This presentation should not be relied upon as a recommendation or forecast by BHP. BHP and its subsidiaries In this presentation, the terms 'BHP', the 'Company', the 'Group', 'our business', 'organization', 'Group', 'we', 'us' and 'our' refer to BHP Group Limited, BHP Group Plc and, except where the context otherwise requires, their respective subsidiaries set out in note 13 'Related undertaking of the Group' in section 5.2 of BHP's Annual Report and Form 20-F. Those terms do not include non-operated assets. This presentation includes references to BHP's assets (including those under exploration, projects in development or execution phases, sites and closed operations) that have been wholly owned and/or operated by BHP and that have been owned as a joint venture operated by BHP (referred to as 'operated assets' or 'operations') during the period from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021. Our functions are also included. BHP also holds interests in assets that are owned as a joint venture but not operated by BHP (referred to in this release as 'non-operated joint ventures' or 'non-operated assets'). Our non-operated assets include Antamina, Cerrejón, Samarco, Atlantis, Mad Dog, Bass Strait and North West Shelf. Notwithstanding that this presentation may include production, financial and other information from non-operated assets, non-operated assets are not included in the Group and, as a result, statements regarding our operations, assets and values apply only to our operated assets unless otherwise stated. References in this presentation to a 'joint venture' are used for convenience to collectively describe assets that are not wholly owned by BHP. Such references are not intended to characterise the legal relationship between the owners of the asset. Jansen Briefing 15 September 2021 2Disclaimer Forward-looking statements This presentation contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding: trends in commodity prices and currency exchange rates; demand for commodities; production forecasts; plans, strategies and objectives of management; assumed long-term scenarios; potential global responses to climate change; the potential effect of possible future events on the value of the BHP portfolio; closure or divestment of certain assets, operations or facilities (including associated costs); anticipated production or construction commencement dates; capital costs and scheduling; operating costs and shortages of materials and skilled employees; anticipated productive lives of projects, mines and facilities; provisions and contingent liabilities; and tax and regulatory developments. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of terminology, including, but not limited to, 'intend', 'aim', 'project', 'anticipate', 'estimate', 'plan', 'believe', 'expect', 'may', 'should', 'will', 'would', 'continue', 'annualised' or similar words. These statements discuss future expectations concerning the results of assets or financial conditions, or provide other forward-looking information. These forward-looking statements are based on the information available as at the date of this presentation and/or the date of the Group's planning processes or scenario analysis processes. There are inherent limitations with scenario analysis and it is difficult to predict which, if any, of the scenarios might eventuate. Scenarios do not constitute definitive outcomes for us. Scenario analysis relies on assumptions that may or may not be, or prove to be, correct and may or may not eventuate, and scenarios may be impacted by additional factors to the assumptions disclosed. Additionally, forward-looking statements are not guarantees or predictions of future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond our control, and which may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the statements contained in this presentation. BHP cautions against reliance on any forward-looking statements or guidance, particularly in light of the current economic climate and the significant volatility, uncertainty and disruption arising in connection with COVID-19. For example, our future revenues from our assets, projects or mines described in this release will be based, in part, upon the market price of the minerals, metals or petroleum produced, which may vary significantly from current levels. These variations, if materially adverse, may affect the timing or the feasibility of the development of a particular project, the expansion of certain facilities or mines, or the continuation of existing assets. Other factors that may affect the actual construction or production commencement dates, costs or production output and anticipated lives of assets, mines or facilities include our ability to profitably produce and transport the minerals, petroleum and/or metals extracted to applicable markets; the impact of foreign currency exchange rates on the market prices of the minerals, petroleum or metals we produce; activities of government authorities in the countries where we sell our products and in the countries where we are exploring or developing projects, facilities or mines, including increases in taxes; changes in environmental and other regulations; the duration and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on our business; political uncertainty; labour unrest; and other factors identified in the risk factors discussed in BHP's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the 'SEC') (including in Annual Reports on Form 20-F) which are available on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. Except as required by applicable regulations or by law, BHP does not undertake to publicly update or review any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information or future events. Past performance cannot be relied on as a guide to future performance. BHP Climate Change Report 2020 This presentation should be read in conjunction with the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 available at bhp.com. Some of the information in this presentation provides a concise overview of certain aspects of that Report and may omit information, analysis and assumptions and, accordingly, BHP cautions readers from relying on that information in this presentation in isolation. Presentation of data Numbers presented may not add up precisely to the totals provided due to rounding. No offer of securities Nothing in this presentation should be construed as either an offer or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell any securities, or a solicitation of any vote or approval, in any jurisdiction, or be treated or relied upon as a recommendation or advice by BHP. No offer of securities shall be made in the United States absent registration under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or pursuant to an exemption from, or in a transaction not subject to, such registration requirements. Reliance on third party information The views expressed in this presentation contain information that has been derived from publicly available sources that have not been independently verified. No representation or warranty is made as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the information. This presentation should not be relied upon as a recommendation or forecast by BHP. BHP and its subsidiaries In this presentation, the terms 'BHP', the 'Company', the 'Group', 'our business', 'organization', 'Group', 'we', 'us' and 'our' refer to BHP Group Limited, BHP Group Plc and, except where the context otherwise requires, their respective subsidiaries set out in note 13 'Related undertaking of the Group' in section 5.2 of BHP's Annual Report and Form 20-F. Those terms do not include non-operated assets. This presentation includes references to BHP's assets (including those under exploration, projects in development or execution phases, sites and closed operations) that have been wholly owned and/or operated by BHP and that have been owned as a joint venture operated by BHP (referred to as 'operated assets' or 'operations') during the period from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021. Our functions are also included. BHP also holds interests in assets that are owned as a joint venture but not operated by BHP (referred to in this release as 'non-operated joint ventures' or 'non-operated assets'). Our non-operated assets include Antamina, Cerrejón, Samarco, Atlantis, Mad Dog, Bass Strait and North West Shelf. Notwithstanding that this presentation may include production, financial and other information from non-operated assets, non-operated assets are not included in the Group and, as a result, statements regarding our operations, assets and values apply only to our operated assets unless otherwise stated. References in this presentation to a 'joint venture' are used for convenience to collectively describe assets that are not wholly owned by BHP. Such references are not intended to characterise the legal relationship between the owners of the asset. Jansen Briefing 15 September 2021 2

A top tier asset in a future facing commodity Rag Udd President Minerals Americas

Jansen fits our strategy Modern, long life, expandable will support long-term value and returns Attractive future facing commodity • Exposure to global mega trends • A low emission, biosphere friendly fertiliser • Attractive fundamentals, supply-driven market, reliable base demand with attractive upside World class asset • Increases diversification of commodity, customer base and operating footprint for BHP • Long-life asset in a stable mining jurisdiction • Provides a platform for growth via potential capital efficient expansions Operational excellence; leadership on Social Value and sustainability • Utilisation of latest design and technology 1 • First Nations agreements, and targeting 20% indigenous employment • Aspirational goal for a gender balanced workforce • Low water footprint and emissions embedded in design Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 4Jansen fits our strategy Modern, long life, expandable will support long-term value and returns Attractive future facing commodity • Exposure to global mega trends • A low emission, biosphere friendly fertiliser • Attractive fundamentals, supply-driven market, reliable base demand with attractive upside World class asset • Increases diversification of commodity, customer base and operating footprint for BHP • Long-life asset in a stable mining jurisdiction • Provides a platform for growth via potential capital efficient expansions Operational excellence; leadership on Social Value and sustainability • Utilisation of latest design and technology 1 • First Nations agreements, and targeting 20% indigenous employment • Aspirational goal for a gender balanced workforce • Low water footprint and emissions embedded in design Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 4

Our portfolio benefits Potash increases BHP's diversification of demand drivers, customer base and operating footprint Differentiated Diversified Increased Demand drivers Customer base Operating footprint • Potash is not strongly correlated with • Potash market is globally diverse, with • Increases geographic diversification of broader economic and commodity cycles >35% made up by Brazil and USA portfolio • Benefits from a decarbonising world, • Differs from BHP's existing commodity • Operating exposure to Canada, a cumulative demand would more than exposures leading, stable mining jurisdiction double in the next 30 years under our 1.5 2 degree scenario 3 5 4 2030 revenue by demand drivers Typical customer base for potash 2030 operating footprint Jansen S1 Brazil USA Australia North America Other future facing commodities China South East Asia South America Steel making raw materials India RoW Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 5Our portfolio benefits Potash increases BHP's diversification of demand drivers, customer base and operating footprint Differentiated Diversified Increased Demand drivers Customer base Operating footprint • Potash is not strongly correlated with • Potash market is globally diverse, with • Increases geographic diversification of broader economic and commodity cycles >35% made up by Brazil and USA portfolio • Benefits from a decarbonising world, • Differs from BHP's existing commodity • Operating exposure to Canada, a cumulative demand would more than exposures leading, stable mining jurisdiction double in the next 30 years under our 1.5 2 degree scenario 3 5 4 2030 revenue by demand drivers Typical customer base for potash 2030 operating footprint Jansen S1 Brazil USA Australia North America Other future facing commodities China South East Asia South America Steel making raw materials India RoW Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 5

Jansen S1 is resilient with through the cycle returns Margins and returns expected to be robust even under short-run marginal cost scenarios EBITDA margin IRR Payback ~70% 12-14% 7 years 6 7 st Underlying EBITDA margin Stage 1 Internal Rate of Return from 1 production Operating Cost Optionality Carbon Emissions Stage 2-4 Low ~US$100/t 8 9 Low capital intensity, higher returning CO Scope 1 and 2 emissions; Scope 3 bottom of the cost curve 2 expansion potential low relative to other fertiliser products Note: Operating costs based on FOB Vancouver. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 6Jansen S1 is resilient with through the cycle returns Margins and returns expected to be robust even under short-run marginal cost scenarios EBITDA margin IRR Payback ~70% 12-14% 7 years 6 7 st Underlying EBITDA margin Stage 1 Internal Rate of Return from 1 production Operating Cost Optionality Carbon Emissions Stage 2-4 Low ~US$100/t 8 9 Low capital intensity, higher returning CO Scope 1 and 2 emissions; Scope 3 bottom of the cost curve 2 expansion potential low relative to other fertiliser products Note: Operating costs based on FOB Vancouver. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 6

Structural competitive advantages Modern, large scale conventional mine with modern design providing platform for future growth Geology & Resource Mining system Hoisting Processing Outbound logistics Upfront ~60% less Shaft design ~20-50% Leading equipment Continuous, geological equipment delivers larger than and material automated loading information lower costs handling systems system competitors Full life of mine planning Larger borers make a Large capacity supports Modern plant design With port now secured of resource leveraging unique, integrated low capital intensity delivers high recoveries, Jansen has a path to 3D seismic technology mining system expansion options lower emissions and market for its product water use Our approach to Social Value and environmental stewardship underpin Jansen's development Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 7Structural competitive advantages Modern, large scale conventional mine with modern design providing platform for future growth Geology & Resource Mining system Hoisting Processing Outbound logistics Upfront ~60% less Shaft design ~20-50% Leading equipment Continuous, geological equipment delivers larger than and material automated loading information lower costs handling systems system competitors Full life of mine planning Larger borers make a Large capacity supports Modern plant design With port now secured of resource leveraging unique, integrated low capital intensity delivers high recoveries, Jansen has a path to 3D seismic technology mining system expansion options lower emissions and market for its product water use Our approach to Social Value and environmental stewardship underpin Jansen's development Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 7

Jansen S1 provides a platform for growth 10 Stages 2-4 would make Jansen one of the world's largest potash operation 11 Estimated production from potential incremental stages beyond Jansen S1 (MOP Production, Mt) 20 Lower capital Higher incremental intensity returns 16 Jansen S4 12 14 18-20% IRR 12 US$800 - 900/t Jansen S3 ~4 year payback 8 Jansen S2 4 15 12-14% IRR 13 Jansen S1 US$1,200/t 7 year payback 0 Production years Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 8Jansen S1 provides a platform for growth 10 Stages 2-4 would make Jansen one of the world's largest potash operation 11 Estimated production from potential incremental stages beyond Jansen S1 (MOP Production, Mt) 20 Lower capital Higher incremental intensity returns 16 Jansen S4 12 14 18-20% IRR 12 US$800 - 900/t Jansen S3 ~4 year payback 8 Jansen S2 4 15 12-14% IRR 13 Jansen S1 US$1,200/t 7 year payback 0 Production years Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 8

Potash market outlook Dr Huw McKay Chief EconomistPotash market outlook Dr Huw McKay Chief Economist

Potash fundamentals: key messages A future facing commodity with attractive long term fundamentals from multiple angles • Potash sits at the intersection of global demographic, social and environmental megatrends A Future Facing • The environmental footprint of potash is considerably more attractive than other major chemical fertilisers Commodity • Conventional mining with flotation is more energy and water efficient than other production routes • Traditional demand drivers of population and diet are reliable and slow moving Reliable base • Attractive upside over basic drivers exists due to the rising potash intensity-of-use needed to support demand with higher yields and offset depleting soil fertility attractive upside 16 • On top of the already compelling case, decarbonisation could amplify demand upside • Demand is catching up to excess supply, and major supply basins are mature Demand to catch-up • Price formation regime accordingly expected to transition from current SRMC to durable inducement pricing, with Canada well placed to meet market growth longer term at LRMC in the mid $300s over the course of the 2020s • Post the balance point, long-run geological and agronomic arguments skew probabilistic risks upwards (LRMC plus fly-up) rather than downwards (SRMC), in our view Note: Short Run Marginal Cost (SRMC); Long Run Marginal Cost (LRMC). Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 10Potash fundamentals: key messages A future facing commodity with attractive long term fundamentals from multiple angles • Potash sits at the intersection of global demographic, social and environmental megatrends A Future Facing • The environmental footprint of potash is considerably more attractive than other major chemical fertilisers Commodity • Conventional mining with flotation is more energy and water efficient than other production routes • Traditional demand drivers of population and diet are reliable and slow moving Reliable base • Attractive upside over basic drivers exists due to the rising potash intensity-of-use needed to support demand with higher yields and offset depleting soil fertility attractive upside 16 • On top of the already compelling case, decarbonisation could amplify demand upside • Demand is catching up to excess supply, and major supply basins are mature Demand to catch-up • Price formation regime accordingly expected to transition from current SRMC to durable inducement pricing, with Canada well placed to meet market growth longer term at LRMC in the mid $300s over the course of the 2020s • Post the balance point, long-run geological and agronomic arguments skew probabilistic risks upwards (LRMC plus fly-up) rather than downwards (SRMC), in our view Note: Short Run Marginal Cost (SRMC); Long Run Marginal Cost (LRMC). Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 10

Fundamental relationships are extremely reliable Crop production growth has exceeded population growth historically: potash has in turn exceeded growth in crop production Population up ~2.5 fold since 1960, crops ~3.5 fold, potash ~4.5 fold CAGR, 1960-1993 (Index, 1960 = 100) (%) 500 3 Potash fertiliser 450 2 demand 400 1 Crop 1.9 2.3 2.4 production Collapse of 350 0 Eastern Bloc Population Crop production Potash fertiliser 300 CAGR, 1993-2020 (%) Population 3 250 2 200 1 150 1.2 2.1 2.7 100 0 Population Crop production Potash fertiliser 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Data: UN World Population Prospects 2019; International Fertilizer Association; BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Note: 'potash fertiliser demand' relates to estimated underlying consumption at the farm-level rather than to upstream MOP shipments. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 11Fundamental relationships are extremely reliable Crop production growth has exceeded population growth historically: potash has in turn exceeded growth in crop production Population up ~2.5 fold since 1960, crops ~3.5 fold, potash ~4.5 fold CAGR, 1960-1993 (Index, 1960 = 100) (%) 500 3 Potash fertiliser 450 2 demand 400 1 Crop 1.9 2.3 2.4 production Collapse of 350 0 Eastern Bloc Population Crop production Potash fertiliser 300 CAGR, 1993-2020 (%) Population 3 250 2 200 1 150 1.2 2.1 2.7 100 0 Population Crop production Potash fertiliser 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Data: UN World Population Prospects 2019; International Fertilizer Association; BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Note: 'potash fertiliser demand' relates to estimated underlying consumption at the farm-level rather than to upstream MOP shipments. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 11

Potash benefits in a decarbonising world Rising biofuels production and land use implications of afforestation burnish an already attractive potash demand profile 17 Cumulative demand expected in the next 30 years compared to the last 30 years (%) 400 1.5°C Scenario Already compelling Central Energy View demand case … Lower Carbon View … potentially amplified under Climate Crisis a 1.5 degree pathway 300 200 100 0 18 18 19 19 Nickel Potash Copper Iron ore Metallurgical coal Source: BHP; Vivid Economics. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 12

How soon will demand catch-up? 20 Consensus view is that demand will catch-up in the late 2020s/early 2030s MOP demand (Mt) 110 3% average CAGR 100 2% average CAGR 90 21 Specialist average (1.7%) Achievable production (w/o Jansen) 1% average CAGR Jansen S1 80 Greenfield under construction Spare capacity,, brownfield 70 expansion Existing supply 60 10 year linear trend (+1.8 Mt/y) 50 40 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 13How soon will demand catch-up? 20 Consensus view is that demand will catch-up in the late 2020s/early 2030s MOP demand (Mt) 110 3% average CAGR 100 2% average CAGR 90 21 Specialist average (1.7%) Achievable production (w/o Jansen) 1% average CAGR Jansen S1 80 Greenfield under construction Spare capacity,, brownfield 70 expansion Existing supply 60 10 year linear trend (+1.8 Mt/y) 50 40 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 13

Identifying available capacity from supply Estimated ~76 Mt Achievable Production in 2020, rising to ~86Mt with forthcoming additions CY2020 capacity (Mtpa MOP) 100 90 Can be re-utilised in future 80 70 60 50 Nameplate Inaccessible Allowance for Achievable Temporary Expected Shortfall Actual Re-utilisation Capacity Future capacity capacity unplanned production curtailment production production under ramp-up / achievable downtime construction production Data: BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 14

What can be expected under inducement & fly-up pricing? Forward looking LRMC is broadly in line with through-cycle averages, considerably above SRMC experience of the last few years MOP price (US$/t real) 750 Near term Upswing average estimate Indicative of multi-year 'fly-up' pricing should a strong demand-led 2008-2013 500 cycle emerge with a delayed supply response from ageing basins ~$470 Through cycle average 2008 to date Long-run marginal cost (LRMC) ~$350 22 at mid case macro assumptions 250 Short-run marginal cost (SRMC) 23 across a range of macro assumptions Downswing average 2014 to date ~$260 0 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Data: IHS Markit. Average trade value of Canadian MOP exports. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 15

Potash marketing Mark Swan Head of Sales & Marketing, PotashPotash marketing Mark Swan Head of Sales & Marketing, Potash

Fertiliser and MOP product overview MOP is main and most economic essential source of potassium nutrient and has small environmental footprint 25 Consumption of primary inorganic Consumption of potash fertilisers Not all fertilisers have the same environmental footprint: 24 fertilisers N P MOP fertiliser fertiliser (flotation) ~20% Production footprint Potash (K) fertilisers Agricultural MOP Low Scope 1+2 emissions ~95% KCl ûûü (<100kg CO e/t) 2 Standard/fine 25% Red or white Low water consumption (<1t/t) ûûü Phosphate (P) fertilisers such as DAP and SSP Consumption footprint High nutrient content, lower 26 26 llü transport emissions Agricultural MOP ~95% KCl No energy-intensive Granular üüü downstream processing 55% Red or white 28 Nitrogen (N) fertilisers such as urea 27 No N O/CO release on use 2 2ûüü and ammonium nitrate No risk to waterways ûûü Industrial MOP, >99% KCl, White Higher yields need less MOP derivatives 6% MOP derivatives üüü 29 cultivated virgin land ~4% Other Outline illustrates what can be supplied by Jansen agricultural red granular and standard products Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 17Fertiliser and MOP product overview MOP is main and most economic essential source of potassium nutrient and has small environmental footprint 25 Consumption of primary inorganic Consumption of potash fertilisers Not all fertilisers have the same environmental footprint: 24 fertilisers N P MOP fertiliser fertiliser (flotation) ~20% Production footprint Potash (K) fertilisers Agricultural MOP Low Scope 1+2 emissions ~95% KCl ûûü (<100kg CO e/t) 2 Standard/fine 25% Red or white Low water consumption (<1t/t) ûûü Phosphate (P) fertilisers such as DAP and SSP Consumption footprint High nutrient content, lower 26 26 llü transport emissions Agricultural MOP ~95% KCl No energy-intensive Granular üüü downstream processing 55% Red or white 28 Nitrogen (N) fertilisers such as urea 27 No N O/CO release on use 2 2ûüü and ammonium nitrate No risk to waterways ûûü Industrial MOP, >99% KCl, White Higher yields need less MOP derivatives 6% MOP derivatives üüü 29 cultivated virgin land ~4% Other Outline illustrates what can be supplied by Jansen agricultural red granular and standard products Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 17

MOP market value chain overview Potash producers sell vast majority of CFR directly to disaggregated and diverse global buyers Producers Delivered disport CFR Sales Post CFR (disport to farm) End Users • Relatively concentrated • Producers sell mostly CFR to 3rd parties (directly via • Complex, highly disaggregated • Established 32 industry regional office networks) and low barriers to entry product at 100s of millions of • Flexibly manage utilisation • Globally disaggregated and diverse buyers • Insufficient to lock out others and farms not required to sell bulk potash • Buyer patterns and customary practices vary by region, but some terms similar to other bulks • Limited producer integration to capture downstream synergy Distributor Blender 30 31 2020 potash production Typical regional import price terms (% by producer) (% import demand) China Retailer NPK Factory Other India S.E.Asia Brazil North America Up to 12m fixed 3m to 9m fixed Belaruskali/Uralkali Others Up to 4m fixed Up to 1m fixed ~Sold via Nutrien/Mosaic Canpotex Varies by region Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 18MOP market value chain overview Potash producers sell vast majority of CFR directly to disaggregated and diverse global buyers Producers Delivered disport CFR Sales Post CFR (disport to farm) End Users • Relatively concentrated • Producers sell mostly CFR to 3rd parties (directly via • Complex, highly disaggregated • Established 32 industry regional office networks) and low barriers to entry product at 100s of millions of • Flexibly manage utilisation • Globally disaggregated and diverse buyers • Insufficient to lock out others and farms not required to sell bulk potash • Buyer patterns and customary practices vary by region, but some terms similar to other bulks • Limited producer integration to capture downstream synergy Distributor Blender 30 31 2020 potash production Typical regional import price terms (% by producer) (% import demand) China Retailer NPK Factory Other India S.E.Asia Brazil North America Up to 12m fixed 3m to 9m fixed Belaruskali/Uralkali Others Up to 4m fixed Up to 1m fixed ~Sold via Nutrien/Mosaic Canpotex Varies by region Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 18

Jansen's advantages help shape marketing approach Jansen will be well positioned for entry into market and growth Buyers welcome new independent Upstream CFR logistics and direct entrant to diversify & support growth US rail capability provide both Up to 100 years of reliable supply in access and flexibility stable jurisdiction Minimises working capital and Low-cost position makes Jansen avoids lower distribution margins competitive through the cycle Jansen S1 to sell two established agricultural red MOP products Positioned to capture future Majority of sales expected to be on demand growth through potential term contract basis Jansen expansions Jansen's location and ESG credentials attractive to buyers Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 19Jansen's advantages help shape marketing approach Jansen will be well positioned for entry into market and growth Buyers welcome new independent Upstream CFR logistics and direct entrant to diversify & support growth US rail capability provide both Up to 100 years of reliable supply in access and flexibility stable jurisdiction Minimises working capital and Low-cost position makes Jansen avoids lower distribution margins competitive through the cycle Jansen S1 to sell two established agricultural red MOP products Positioned to capture future Majority of sales expected to be on demand growth through potential term contract basis Jansen expansions Jansen's location and ESG credentials attractive to buyers Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 19

Plan to market directly to large diverse customers BHP to place product to dozens of large customers globally Illustrative Target Regions Illustrative geographic sales mix for Jansen Stage 1 product USA • Big stable granular region • 50+ buyers Brazil • Largest growing granular region • 50+ buyers India • Growing high potential standard region • ~20 buyers SE Asia • Growing standard and granular region • 40+ buyers USA Brazil India SE Asia China RoW China • Growing standard and granular imports • 30+ buyers RoW • Many smaller standard and granular territories Major growth import markets Mature market • 50+ buyers Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 20Plan to market directly to large diverse customers BHP to place product to dozens of large customers globally Illustrative Target Regions Illustrative geographic sales mix for Jansen Stage 1 product USA • Big stable granular region • 50+ buyers Brazil • Largest growing granular region • 50+ buyers India • Growing high potential standard region • ~20 buyers SE Asia • Growing standard and granular region • 40+ buyers USA Brazil India SE Asia China RoW China • Growing standard and granular imports • 30+ buyers RoW • Many smaller standard and granular territories Major growth import markets Mature market • 50+ buyers Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 20

Prepared to secure sales on entry into market Non-binding MOUs in place with major importers for up to 100% of future production Time to grow team and relationships • Experienced global team have established buyer relationships 2021 First and secured MOUs production Non-binding • Expanded team will have >5 years to prepare including growing 33 MOUs with Secure binding relationships and securing binding sales major importers offtake agreement for up to 100% for up to 100% • Replicate tried and tested model of marketing directly to major of sales of sales customers via regional offices leveraging BHP's broader commercial resources Marketing deliverables already well advanced • Geographically diverse sales targeting new growth demand will help secure competitive placement and prices A global approach, targeting new • Jansen will be competitive on entry and have contingency options available demand in growth regions Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 21Prepared to secure sales on entry into market Non-binding MOUs in place with major importers for up to 100% of future production Time to grow team and relationships • Experienced global team have established buyer relationships 2021 First and secured MOUs production Non-binding • Expanded team will have >5 years to prepare including growing 33 MOUs with Secure binding relationships and securing binding sales major importers offtake agreement for up to 100% for up to 100% • Replicate tried and tested model of marketing directly to major of sales of sales customers via regional offices leveraging BHP's broader commercial resources Marketing deliverables already well advanced • Geographically diverse sales targeting new growth demand will help secure competitive placement and prices A global approach, targeting new • Jansen will be competitive on entry and have contingency options available demand in growth regions Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 21

Jansen project overview Giles Hellyer Vice President Operations, PotashJansen project overview Giles Hellyer Vice President Operations, Potash

Jansen is in the world's premier producing potash basin The mine footprint is within the well established conventional mining corridor 35 6.5 Bt mineral resources in world's best potash basin A history of potash mining • The first potash mine opened in Saskatchewan in 1958, followed by a decade of rapid expansion and new projects • The 2010s introduced a new era of expansion with four new shafts (Nutrien, Mosaic, BHP) and construction of a greenfield solution mine (K+S) • Today, Saskatchewan hosts seven conventional and three solution mines, producing approximately one-third of the world's potash BHP's approach to selecting Jansen • BHP holds ~37% of potash mineral tenure in basin • Exploration of the basin through drilling and 2D and 3D seismic studies helped identify Jansen as the most prospective project • Jansen S1 marks the first step for BHP to unlock a large land position across this world class basin 34 • Large-scale resource supports up to 100 years of operation Source: BHP Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 23Jansen is in the world's premier producing potash basin The mine footprint is within the well established conventional mining corridor 35 6.5 Bt mineral resources in world's best potash basin A history of potash mining • The first potash mine opened in Saskatchewan in 1958, followed by a decade of rapid expansion and new projects • The 2010s introduced a new era of expansion with four new shafts (Nutrien, Mosaic, BHP) and construction of a greenfield solution mine (K+S) • Today, Saskatchewan hosts seven conventional and three solution mines, producing approximately one-third of the world's potash BHP's approach to selecting Jansen • BHP holds ~37% of potash mineral tenure in basin • Exploration of the basin through drilling and 2D and 3D seismic studies helped identify Jansen as the most prospective project • Jansen S1 marks the first step for BHP to unlock a large land position across this world class basin 34 • Large-scale resource supports up to 100 years of operation Source: BHP Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 23

Modern, high margin, long life and expandable Jansen S1 is expected to be a large, low cost asset that will enter the market at the bottom of the global cost curve36 Jansen S1's competitive position against peers Well defined Initial investment (Average asset age in 2025) US$5.7 bn / C$7.5 bn 80 Note: Bubble size represents average asset Europe and production in 2025 Middle East 70 Large scale 4.35 Mtpa 60 production Canada 50 Clusters of single Hard-to-replicate Across mining system CIS assets 40 design and processing built over time 30 South America ~US$100/t FOB Vancouver China and Low-cost 20 ~US$15/t sustaining capex Southeast Asia 10 Embedded Potential expansions de-risked by 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th optionality existing shaft capacity Average asset cost curve position (2025 equivalent CRU) (quartile) Jansen S137 Peers38 Source: BHP; CRU. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 24

Sustainable approach to emissions and water Greenhouse gas emissions and efficient water use a core focus for Jansen S1 and beyond Taking steps to lower emissions at start up • Jansen expected to emit ~50% less CO e per tonne of product39 vs. 2 average performer in Saskatchewan potash mines • Underground mining and support fleet will be more than 80% battery electric vehicles by consumption, will pursue 100% electrification • Pursue carbon neutral electricity through commercial partnerships • Look to implement technologies like carbon capture and storage to mitigate natural gas emissions in processing plant Built to minimise water usage from Day 1 • ~60% less fresh water consumed per tonne than current third party average operation due to process technology and equipment efficiency 40 • Usage of high KCl leach brine for grade control, greater use of brine for mixing reagents both replacing water Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 25

Jansen is positioned to outperform peers Modern design offers structural, competitive advantages Peer 1 Peer 2 Peer 3 Peer 4 41 Jansen stage 1 Jansen stage 1-4 Production ~13 Mtpa ~8 Mtpa ~11 Mtpa ~12 Mtpa 4.35 Mtpa Potential 16-17 Mtpa42 1 Locations 1 1 6 3 5 5 2 Total shafts 1 2 11 6 8 10 New borer technology 3 Mining technology Conventional borer fleet (60% less fleet) 4 Plant design & number 1 mill 4 identical 9 different 4 different 6 different 5 different 5 Mine site employees ~500 ~1,200 ~2,300 ~1,600 ~12,000 ~9,700 6 Rail cars Continuous, automated loading Batch, manual loading 7 Port infrastructure 1 1 3 3 1 1 Source 43 : Company reports, CRU, Fertecon, BHP analysis. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 26

All major permits in place Approvals will enable rapid completion and ramp up of Stage one Major construction permits in place Major permits Rail Environmental Impact Study Approved • Commercial agreement to be negotiated with rail operators Conceptual Closure Plan Approved Other key requirements Port Water rights licence • Agreement struck with Westshore Terminal in Delta, Approved BC Canada, ~2,000km from the Jansen site • Agreement captures Jansen S1 and S2 production, Port and Rail In progress with additional expansion potential Shaft progress Shafts Final lining completion 93% complete44 • Expected completion end of CY2244 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 27

Competitive on costs At nameplate capacity expected to be lowest cost producer in Canada Well defined operating cost base 2030 Potash operating cost curve, Jansen S1 ~US$100/t FOB cost (US$/t real) • Operating cost advantage stems from the ore body, mining 250 method, technology and operating strategy 200 Jansen S1 • Operating costs for Jansen S1 are expected to be ~US$100/t FOB 150 with sustaining capital ~US$15/t (real) +/-20% in any given year 100 • Confidence in opex forecast stems from extensive study, trial 50 mining and independent benchmarking 0 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% • Cost forecasts also include both contingency and escalation FOB operating cost including royalties in 2030; X axis production in % terms. Source: MineSpans. Cash cost breakdown of Jansen S1 Strong understanding of cost drivers and risks (~US$100/t FOB Vancouver, %) • Canadian dollar exposure is ~85% for average life of mine on an FOB basis, including sustaining capital 19% 19% Mining • Potential inflationary pressures include labour escalation, cost of Processing Logistics utilities like power, and carbon. 26% 36% Other Note: FOB - Free On Board. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 28

Jansen S1 design deep dive Giles Hellyer Vice President Operations, Potash Cheryll Godwin-Abel Manager Project Delivery, Mining Mike Elliott Project Director, Jansen Project

Strong understanding of underlying geology Work program enabled detailed understanding of resource and optimisation of life of mine plan Extensive work to date de-risks project 3D seismic area and measured resource at Jansen • Extensive and modern 3D seismic technology, unavailable to new producers decades ago, enables development of integrated resource model • The Jansen advantage: - Hazardous geological features identified and avoided across mine plan area, significantly reducing water ingress risk - Detailed understanding of resource informs the full life-of-mine plan, optimising value • Given the constraints of legacy mine workings, established mines are unable to replicate this advantage to the same extent as Jansen Large resource base45 supports optionality • 6,510 Mt of Total Mineral Resources at a grade of 25.6% K2O • 1,070 Mt of Total Ore Reserves at a grade of 24.9% K2O Source: BHP Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 30

Advanced mining technology to be utilised Approach drives sustainable cost, safety and emissions benefits Larger sized borers, continuous conveyance and automation Photo of Jansen borer at mining trial • Existing technology, adapted and scaled into a unique integrated mining system • Four mining systems produce equivalent of 10 to 14 standard systems - Higher capacity systems mean fewer active mining faces - ~60% less fleet creates ~10% operating cost saving Full-scale, extended underground trial lowers risk • BHP has spent multiple years extensively trialling our mining system prototype in a salt mine in Heilbronn, Germany Designed with sustainability in mind • More than 80% of underground and support fleet by consumption will use electrical energy sources, instead of diesel Dotted line indicates typical conventional borer height Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 31

Shaft capacity unlocks optionality Scale and latest technology deliver an advantage Shafts set for completion in 2022 Shaft liner installation • Shaft construction well progressed 93%46 complete at time of sanction de-risking the path to Jansen S1 production • Fully waterproof shaft liner for longer life, lower operating cost, and higher hoist run-time • Jansen has a 100% composite hydrostatic liner unlike other assets in the basin Shaft diameter is 20% to 50% larger than competitors' • 7.3m shaft diameter removes need to sink future ventilation shafts over the life of mine even if Stages 2-4 are sanctioned Hoisted ore higher than peers • Available hoisting capacity delivers economies of scale and lower (Ore Mtpa) capital intensity expansion options 60 • Production hoists equipped with latest safety systems and rope 40 monitoring technology 20 0 Jansen Stage 1 Jansen Stage 4 Peer 1 Peer 2 (1 shaft) (2 shafts) (2 shafts) (2 shafts) Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 32

Modern, efficient processing plant design Optimised for increased recovery and plant utilisation Leading recovery rates and potential operating hours Processing sub-areas render • ~92% recovery rate enabled by separate fine and coarse flotation with on-stream analysis and crystallization which recovers fine potash from waste streams • Setting a new benchmark for equipment and decision automation - Fully integrated process control from borer to train load-out - 3x the number of process sensors and 10x the machine health monitoring sensors vs. next largest producer in Saskatchewan - Fully automated raw ore and product reclaim • Dual production lines and larger raw ore and storage than competitors to enable highest plant run time in the province Process plant recovery higher than peers (%) Designed with sustainability in mind 95 • Best in the basin: 90 - Jansen expected to emit ~50% less CO e per tonne of 2 47 product vs. average performer in Saskatchewan potash mines 85 3 48 - Jansen's water usage is ~60% less m per tonne of product vs. average performer in Saskatchewan potash mines 80 Jansen Stage 1 Peer 1 Peer 2 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 33Modern, efficient processing plant design Optimised for increased recovery and plant utilisation Leading recovery rates and potential operating hours Processing sub-areas render • ~92% recovery rate enabled by separate fine and coarse flotation with on-stream analysis and crystallization which recovers fine potash from waste streams • Setting a new benchmark for equipment and decision automation - Fully integrated process control from borer to train load-out - 3x the number of process sensors and 10x the machine health monitoring sensors vs. next largest producer in Saskatchewan - Fully automated raw ore and product reclaim • Dual production lines and larger raw ore and storage than competitors to enable highest plant run time in the province Process plant recovery higher than peers (%) Designed with sustainability in mind 95 • Best in the basin: 90 - Jansen expected to emit ~50% less CO e per tonne of 2 47 product vs. average performer in Saskatchewan potash mines 85 3 48 - Jansen's water usage is ~60% less m per tonne of product vs. average performer in Saskatchewan potash mines 80 Jansen Stage 1 Peer 1 Peer 2 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 33

Outbound logistics support Jansen S1 and beyond Agreements and investment set to deliver efficient path to market for Jansen's product Location of Westshore Terminal ~2,000km from Jansen Rail 25 km Rail route • Continuous high-speed loading and unloading systems to Vancouver maximise efficiency and reduce loading and unloading times • Embedded advantage from Jansen S1 railway spurs linking to both class 1 rail networks in Canada • BHP to operate with dedicated fleet of rail cars Westshore Terminal Canada United States Port Artist render of Jansen infrastructure at Westshore terminals • Long-term partnership with Westshore Terminals in Delta, BC Canada, ~2,000km from Jansen, to develop dedicated facilities • Well-established bulk operator in a prime location offering deep water and best-in-class rail access in Port of Vancouver Image to be improved • Will provide efficient rail unloading, storage and vessel loading as part of a world-class logistics system • Westshore's transition to Potash will serve Jansen S1 and potential S2 production, with significant expansion potential Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 34Outbound logistics support Jansen S1 and beyond Agreements and investment set to deliver efficient path to market for Jansen's product Location of Westshore Terminal ~2,000km from Jansen Rail 25 km Rail route • Continuous high-speed loading and unloading systems to Vancouver maximise efficiency and reduce loading and unloading times • Embedded advantage from Jansen S1 railway spurs linking to both class 1 rail networks in Canada • BHP to operate with dedicated fleet of rail cars Westshore Terminal Canada United States Port Artist render of Jansen infrastructure at Westshore terminals • Long-term partnership with Westshore Terminals in Delta, BC Canada, ~2,000km from Jansen, to develop dedicated facilities • Well-established bulk operator in a prime location offering deep water and best-in-class rail access in Port of Vancouver Image to be improved • Will provide efficient rail unloading, storage and vessel loading as part of a world-class logistics system • Westshore's transition to Potash will serve Jansen S1 and potential S2 production, with significant expansion potential Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 34

Project Management Simon Thomas Vice President Projects, PotashProject Management Simon Thomas Vice President Projects, Potash

BHP has a strong track record of major project delivery Recent successes include South Flank and Spence Growth Option South Flank iron ore project in Australia Proven project management and potash capability • Experienced project management and delivery team at Jansen • More than 25% of team from the potash industry, including strong underground operating experience • Project Centre of Excellence in Saskatoon provides support to regional projects Drawing on recent success in project execution SGO copper project in Chile • BHP has recently delivered about US$7 billion of projects on schedule and budget: - South Flank, Spence Growth Option, Ruby, Escondida Water Supply Extension • Transferring team members from these projects to Jansen • Leveraging lessons learnt from these projects, incorporating this into Jansen S1 planning and execution Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 36BHP has a strong track record of major project delivery Recent successes include South Flank and Spence Growth Option South Flank iron ore project in Australia Proven project management and potash capability • Experienced project management and delivery team at Jansen • More than 25% of team from the potash industry, including strong underground operating experience • Project Centre of Excellence in Saskatoon provides support to regional projects Drawing on recent success in project execution SGO copper project in Chile • BHP has recently delivered about US$7 billion of projects on schedule and budget: - South Flank, Spence Growth Option, Ruby, Escondida Water Supply Extension • Transferring team members from these projects to Jansen • Leveraging lessons learnt from these projects, incorporating this into Jansen S1 planning and execution Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 36

Plans in place to manage potential capex pressures Budget of US$5.7 billion / C$7.5 bn Investment spend profile Well scoped capital budget (US$ billion) • ~50% of engineering has been completed, with more than 45% 1.6 of procurement orders placed, including long lead items like mining system, processing and electrical equipment 1.2 0.8 • Capex is ~85% Canadian dollars, with built in contingency 0.4 • Fixed project capex for port at Westshore 0.0 • Exposure to supplied and fabricated steel is only ~US$200m FY22 FY23 FY24 FY25 FY26 FY27 FY28 Existing approved spend Jansen S1 Investment Capital spend back-end weighted Capital cost breakdown of Jansen S1 • Near term pre-FY24 spend includes indirect costs, shaft fit-out, (US$5.7 billion, %) mine room development, and purchase of mining equipment • Spend in later years will be on mill construction, mine 20% Mining 34% equipment installation, port infrastructure and ramp up of Processing operational workforce Logistics 46% Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 37

Schedule optimised to a high level of confidence 6 year construction period to first production followed by a 2 year ramp-up Critical Path Activity CY21 CY22 CY23 CY24 CY25 CY26 CY27 CY28 49 Current Scope Final Liner Production and Service shaft Shafts handover Jansen Stage 1 Shaft infrastructure fit out Service shaft ready to hoist Production shaft ready to hoist Underground Development U/G development milestone Mine Construction Mine Equipment (assembly, commissioning) Mine ready to feed mill Processing and Non-Processing Infra. L1 commissioning start L2 ramp up start Main power supply L1 ramp up start Logistics Rail and Port Terminal Ready for first train Ready for first ship Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 38Schedule optimised to a high level of confidence 6 year construction period to first production followed by a 2 year ramp-up Critical Path Activity CY21 CY22 CY23 CY24 CY25 CY26 CY27 CY28 49 Current Scope Final Liner Production and Service shaft Shafts handover Jansen Stage 1 Shaft infrastructure fit out Service shaft ready to hoist Production shaft ready to hoist Underground Development U/G development milestone Mine Construction Mine Equipment (assembly, commissioning) Mine ready to feed mill Processing and Non-Processing Infra. L1 commissioning start L2 ramp up start Main power supply L1 ramp up start Logistics Rail and Port Terminal Ready for first train Ready for first ship Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 38

Social Value Lindsay Brumwell Manager Corporate Affairs, PotashSocial Value Lindsay Brumwell Manager Corporate Affairs, Potash

Social Value will be at the core of Jansen's development Project will make significant contributions to Canada, including Saskatchewan Economic contribution Capital spend Job creation ~85% ~C$1.8 billion ~3,500 of estimated total project spend in direct and indirect contribution to local jobs at peak of Jansen S1 construction, 50 Canadian dollars GDP up to first year of production ~600 during production Diversity and inclusion Local communities Gender balance 20% 37% C$35 m Indigenous employees targeted during females in potash business; aspirational in local community donations over the past 51 operation goal for a gender balanced workforce six years during operation Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 40Social Value will be at the core of Jansen's development Project will make significant contributions to Canada, including Saskatchewan Economic contribution Capital spend Job creation ~85% ~C$1.8 billion ~3,500 of estimated total project spend in direct and indirect contribution to local jobs at peak of Jansen S1 construction, 50 Canadian dollars GDP up to first year of production ~600 during production Diversity and inclusion Local communities Gender balance 20% 37% C$35 m Indigenous employees targeted during females in potash business; aspirational in local community donations over the past 51 operation goal for a gender balanced workforce six years during operation Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 40

Agreements with Indigenous peoples Agreements signed with all 6 First Nations communities near the Jansen project Engagement • Unique in the potash industry, opportunities to learn from our First Nation communities on culture and history • Relationships built over 10+ years with regular engagement through community events and agreement governance meetings Opportunities 51 • Diversity: Targeting ~20% Indigenous employment and gender balanced workforce for Jansen S1 • Create: long-term mutually beneficial opportunities in employment, business and community development • Include: commitments to initiatives on education, training, labour force development and social investment • Share: information important to environmental management practices • Assist: in building First Nations business capacity Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 41Agreements with Indigenous peoples Agreements signed with all 6 First Nations communities near the Jansen project Engagement • Unique in the potash industry, opportunities to learn from our First Nation communities on culture and history • Relationships built over 10+ years with regular engagement through community events and agreement governance meetings Opportunities 51 • Diversity: Targeting ~20% Indigenous employment and gender balanced workforce for Jansen S1 • Create: long-term mutually beneficial opportunities in employment, business and community development • Include: commitments to initiatives on education, training, labour force development and social investment • Share: information important to environmental management practices • Assist: in building First Nations business capacity Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 41

Conclusion Rag Udd President Mineral Americas

Jansen is setup for success Our approach to the project is set to deliver long term value and create a platform for growth in potash Attractive future facing commodity • Exposure to global mega trends • A low emission, biosphere friendly fertiliser • Attractive fundamentals, supply-driven market, reliable base demand with attractive upside World class asset • Increased diversification of commodity, customer base and operating footprint for BHP • High-margin and long-life asset in a stable mining jurisdiction • Provides a platform for growth via potential capital efficient expansions Operational excellence; leadership on Social Value and sustainability • Utilisation of latest design and technology 51 • First Nations agreements, and targeting 20% indigenous employment • Aspirational goal for a gender balanced workforce • Low water footprint and emissions embedded in design Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 43Jansen is setup for success Our approach to the project is set to deliver long term value and create a platform for growth in potash Attractive future facing commodity • Exposure to global mega trends • A low emission, biosphere friendly fertiliser • Attractive fundamentals, supply-driven market, reliable base demand with attractive upside World class asset • Increased diversification of commodity, customer base and operating footprint for BHP • High-margin and long-life asset in a stable mining jurisdiction • Provides a platform for growth via potential capital efficient expansions Operational excellence; leadership on Social Value and sustainability • Utilisation of latest design and technology 51 • First Nations agreements, and targeting 20% indigenous employment • Aspirational goal for a gender balanced workforce • Low water footprint and emissions embedded in design Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 43

BHP

Footnotes 1. Slide 4: 1: Aiming to achieve Indigenous workforce participation of 20% by the end of FY27. 2. Slide 5: 2: Cumulative demand increase of 234% in the next 30 years compared to the last 30 years. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for more information about these climate-related scenarios and their assumptions. Scenarios were developed prior to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore any possible effects of the pandemic were not considered in the modelling. 3. Slide 5: 3: 2030 revenue based on consensus pricing, potash is the average of CRU and Argus prices 4. Slide 5 4: Source: CRU 2020 imports 5. Slide 5: 5: Based on number of operations in 2030, Jansen treated as an operation given Stage one sanction 6. Slide 6: 6:Expected Jansen S1 EBITDA margins was conducted on the average of CRU and Argus prices. 7. Slide 6: 7: Expected Jansen S1 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted based on the range of the average CRU and Argus prices in 2027-2037. Jansen S1 IRR is post tax and nominal, and excludes remaining funded investment of ~US$0.35 billion for completion of the shafts and installation of essential service infrastructure and utilities. 8. Slide 6: 8: Scope 1+2 emissions of ~60kg CO2e/t. a) Scope 1+2 emissions for flotation-based MOP ~50-80 kg CO2e/t, other production routes are 100-500kg. High nutrient concentration (60% K2O) maximises efficiency in transportation and spreading. b) From BHP research conducted so far, nitrogen-based fertilisers rather than potash appear to have a larger downstream emissions impact. However, trying to estimate the GHG contribution impact of fertiliser on soils and crops is very complicated. We continue to develop and improve our knowledge in this area. 1. Slide 6: 9: Scope 3 impact relates only to emissions associated with downstream processing and use, not other considerations such as transportation. 2. Slide 8 10: World's largest statement is on a production basis 3. Slide 8: 11 Production target for Stage 1 is based on reported Ore Reserves. Potential incremental stages 2-4 are based on Measured Resources. Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are included in the news release published on 17th August 2021, available to view at www.bhp.com. The execution of future stages would be subject to our review of supply and demand fundamentals and successful competition for capital under our Capital Allocation Framework. 4. Slide 8: 12 Expected Capital Intensity Jansen S2-4, US$/product tonne, Real 1 Jul 2020 5. Slide 8: 13: Expected Capital Intensity Jansen S1, US$/product tonne, Real 1 Jul 2020 6. Slide 8: 14: Expected Jansen S2-S4 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted on consensus prices. Jansen S2-S4 IRR is post tax and nominal. 7. Slide 8: 15: Expected Jansen S1 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted based on the range of the average CRU and Argus prices in 2027-2037. Jansen S1 IRR is post tax and nominal, and excludes remaining funded investment of ~US$0.35 billion for completion of the shafts and installation of essential service infrastructure and utilities. 8. Slide 10: 16 Based on BHP's 1.5°C Scenario. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for information about this scenario and its assumptions. 9. Slide 12: 17: Our portfolio is tested across a range of futures. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for more information about these climate-related scenarios and their assumptions. Scenarios were developed prior to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore any possible effects of the pandemic were not considered in the modelling. 10. Slide 12: 18: Nickel and copper demand references primary metal. 11. Slide 12: 19: Iron ore and metallurgical coal demand based on Contestable Market (Global seaborne market plus Chinese domestic demand). 12. Slide 13: 20: Historical data: CRU. Nutrien range of 2.0% to 2.5% in the 2020s as disclosed in 2021 Q1 earnings call. Achievable production is BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Note that the chart shows linear interpolations that result in the same 2020-2035 aggregate tonnage increment as the stated CAGRs. 13. Slide 13: 21: Specialist average based on CRU, Argus, Fertecon (IHS Markit). 2020-2035 CAGR calculated relative to trend level in 2020 (69.5 Mt) not to actual level estimated by CRU (71.6 Mt). 14. Slide 15: 22, 23: Macro assumptions include items such as FX rates, energy costs, carbon and labour. Shaded boxes are the approximate price range associated with the operating conditions described therein. 15. Slide 17: 24: Data source IFA 16. Slide 17: 25. Estimates for 2020 on a K2O basis, MOP derivatives include 1.7Mt of SOP (secondary production) with the balance NOP. Other includes 1.9Mt primary SOP, 0.3Mt KMS, and 0.1Mt of Polyhalite (or ~700kt of Polyhalite in product tonnes). Data source CRU, Fertecon, BHP analysis. Note 'standard' is ~0.5-1mm and 'fine' ~0.2-0.5mm is typically interchangeable; Agricultural MOP is usually red, but may be white, governed more by production methods than demand, although some have white preference, notably Chinese NPK manufacturers. 17. Slide 17: 26. Varies for different fertilisers. 18. Slide 17: 27. Nitrogen fertiliser use releases N O directly via leaching/volatilisation and indirectly through microbial denitrification. This contributes 10% of CO -equivalent emissions from the global food system. Crippa, M., Solazzo, E., Guizzardi, D. et al. Food systems are 2 2 responsible for a third of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Nat Food 2, 198-209 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00225-9. 19. Slide 17: 28 Some common phosphate fertilisers also contain nitrogen, which generates N O upon use. 2 20. Slide 17: 29 Land-use and land-use change (LULUC), mainly in the form of deforestation, contributes 32% of CO -equivalent emissions from the global food system and 11% of all anthropogenic emissions. Crippa, M., Solazzo, E., Guizzardi, D. et al. Food systems are responsible 2 for a third of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Nat Food 2, 198-209 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00225-9. 21. Slide 18: 30. Data source company reports, BHP analysis 22. Slide 18: 31 Data source CRU, BHP analysis. 'm' abbreviation for month, typical terms only, actual terms can vary depending on circumstance, by example Brazil can selectively be fixed on longer term contracts or the US has longer terms in fill season 23. Slide 18: 32: In general, although in individual regions some complexity can exist as a result of permit availability, government policies, local practices etc Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 45Footnotes 1. Slide 4: 1: Aiming to achieve Indigenous workforce participation of 20% by the end of FY27. 2. Slide 5: 2: Cumulative demand increase of 234% in the next 30 years compared to the last 30 years. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for more information about these climate-related scenarios and their assumptions. Scenarios were developed prior to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore any possible effects of the pandemic were not considered in the modelling. 3. Slide 5: 3: 2030 revenue based on consensus pricing, potash is the average of CRU and Argus prices 4. Slide 5 4: Source: CRU 2020 imports 5. Slide 5: 5: Based on number of operations in 2030, Jansen treated as an operation given Stage one sanction 6. Slide 6: 6:Expected Jansen S1 EBITDA margins was conducted on the average of CRU and Argus prices. 7. Slide 6: 7: Expected Jansen S1 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted based on the range of the average CRU and Argus prices in 2027-2037. Jansen S1 IRR is post tax and nominal, and excludes remaining funded investment of ~US$0.35 billion for completion of the shafts and installation of essential service infrastructure and utilities. 8. Slide 6: 8: Scope 1+2 emissions of ~60kg CO2e/t. a) Scope 1+2 emissions for flotation-based MOP ~50-80 kg CO2e/t, other production routes are 100-500kg. High nutrient concentration (60% K2O) maximises efficiency in transportation and spreading. b) From BHP research conducted so far, nitrogen-based fertilisers rather than potash appear to have a larger downstream emissions impact. However, trying to estimate the GHG contribution impact of fertiliser on soils and crops is very complicated. We continue to develop and improve our knowledge in this area. 1. Slide 6: 9: Scope 3 impact relates only to emissions associated with downstream processing and use, not other considerations such as transportation. 2. Slide 8 10: World's largest statement is on a production basis 3. Slide 8: 11 Production target for Stage 1 is based on reported Ore Reserves. Potential incremental stages 2-4 are based on Measured Resources. Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are included in the news release published on 17th August 2021, available to view at www.bhp.com. The execution of future stages would be subject to our review of supply and demand fundamentals and successful competition for capital under our Capital Allocation Framework. 4. Slide 8: 12 Expected Capital Intensity Jansen S2-4, US$/product tonne, Real 1 Jul 2020 5. Slide 8: 13: Expected Capital Intensity Jansen S1, US$/product tonne, Real 1 Jul 2020 6. Slide 8: 14: Expected Jansen S2-S4 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted on consensus prices. Jansen S2-S4 IRR is post tax and nominal. 7. Slide 8: 15: Expected Jansen S1 IRR of investment decision across ~100 year mine life analysis was conducted based on the range of the average CRU and Argus prices in 2027-2037. Jansen S1 IRR is post tax and nominal, and excludes remaining funded investment of ~US$0.35 billion for completion of the shafts and installation of essential service infrastructure and utilities. 8. Slide 10: 16 Based on BHP's 1.5°C Scenario. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for information about this scenario and its assumptions. 9. Slide 12: 17: Our portfolio is tested across a range of futures. Refer to the BHP Climate Change Report 2020 for more information about these climate-related scenarios and their assumptions. Scenarios were developed prior to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and therefore any possible effects of the pandemic were not considered in the modelling. 10. Slide 12: 18: Nickel and copper demand references primary metal. 11. Slide 12: 19: Iron ore and metallurgical coal demand based on Contestable Market (Global seaborne market plus Chinese domestic demand). 12. Slide 13: 20: Historical data: CRU. Nutrien range of 2.0% to 2.5% in the 2020s as disclosed in 2021 Q1 earnings call. Achievable production is BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Note that the chart shows linear interpolations that result in the same 2020-2035 aggregate tonnage increment as the stated CAGRs. 13. Slide 13: 21: Specialist average based on CRU, Argus, Fertecon (IHS Markit). 2020-2035 CAGR calculated relative to trend level in 2020 (69.5 Mt) not to actual level estimated by CRU (71.6 Mt). 14. Slide 15: 22, 23: Macro assumptions include items such as FX rates, energy costs, carbon and labour. Shaded boxes are the approximate price range associated with the operating conditions described therein. 15. Slide 17: 24: Data source IFA 16. Slide 17: 25. Estimates for 2020 on a K2O basis, MOP derivatives include 1.7Mt of SOP (secondary production) with the balance NOP. Other includes 1.9Mt primary SOP, 0.3Mt KMS, and 0.1Mt of Polyhalite (or ~700kt of Polyhalite in product tonnes). Data source CRU, Fertecon, BHP analysis. Note 'standard' is ~0.5-1mm and 'fine' ~0.2-0.5mm is typically interchangeable; Agricultural MOP is usually red, but may be white, governed more by production methods than demand, although some have white preference, notably Chinese NPK manufacturers. 17. Slide 17: 26. Varies for different fertilisers. 18. Slide 17: 27. Nitrogen fertiliser use releases N O directly via leaching/volatilisation and indirectly through microbial denitrification. This contributes 10% of CO -equivalent emissions from the global food system. Crippa, M., Solazzo, E., Guizzardi, D. et al. Food systems are 2 2 responsible for a third of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Nat Food 2, 198-209 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00225-9. 19. Slide 17: 28 Some common phosphate fertilisers also contain nitrogen, which generates N O upon use. 2 20. Slide 17: 29 Land-use and land-use change (LULUC), mainly in the form of deforestation, contributes 32% of CO -equivalent emissions from the global food system and 11% of all anthropogenic emissions. Crippa, M., Solazzo, E., Guizzardi, D. et al. Food systems are responsible 2 for a third of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Nat Food 2, 198-209 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00225-9. 21. Slide 18: 30. Data source company reports, BHP analysis 22. Slide 18: 31 Data source CRU, BHP analysis. 'm' abbreviation for month, typical terms only, actual terms can vary depending on circumstance, by example Brazil can selectively be fixed on longer term contracts or the US has longer terms in fill season 23. Slide 18: 32: In general, although in individual regions some complexity can exist as a result of permit availability, government policies, local practices etc Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 45

Footnotes cont 1. Slide 21: 33: Majority of agreements are subject to non-disclose agreements. Agreements are typically with major buyers across South/Central America, South/South East Asia/China, and North America. By exception we have disclosed 2 agreements in China at the request of the counterparty (https://www.bhp.com/media-and-insights/news-releases/2019/11/bhp-grows-presence-at-2nd-china-international-import-expo/). 2. Slide 23: 34: Based on a Reserve life of 94 years as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com, with further optionality from Jansen's 5,230 Mt Measured Resource base 3. Slide 23: 35: For further information please refer to Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves, as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com and reported in 100 per cent terms. Competent Persons are B Nemeth (MAusIMM) and O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard (MAusIMM) for Ore Reserves. 4. Slide 24: 36: Figures on this slide refers to Jansen S1; Jansen S1 sustaining capex +/-20% on any given year. 5. Slide 24: 37 Jansen S1 production begins in CY27. Jansen S1 forecast to be first quartile when it reaches full production. 6. Slide 24: 38 Canada excludes Jansen. 7. Slide 25: 39: Jansen to emit ~0.025 tonne CO2e per tonne of product, about half the average emissions of Saskatchewan potash mines. 8. Slide 25: 40 Jansen's water usage to be 0.4 m3 for Stage 1 vs 1.7 m3 per tonne of product for comparable potash processing facilities 9. Slide 26: 41 Production numbers for peers reflect actual 2020 MOP production. 10. Slide 26: 42: Production target for Stage 1 is based on reported Ore Reserves. Potential incremental stages 2-4 are based on Measured Resources. Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are included in the news release published on 17th August 2021, available to view at www.bhp.com. 11. Slide 26: 43: Table reflects Jansen's proposed operation versus current operations at incumbent producers. Assumes full development of Jansen (Stages 1-4); Jansen capacity is equal to production. 12. Slide 27: 44: Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 13. Slide 30: 45: Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com and are reported in 100 per cent terms. Competent Persons are B Nemeth (MAusIMM) and O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard (MAusIMM) for Ore Reserves. 14. Slide 32: 46: Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 15. Slide 33: 47: Jansen's water usage is 5% less m3 per tonne of product than the current best performer amongst Saskatchewan potash mines. Jansen's water usage to be 0.4 m3 for Stage 1 vs 1.7 m3 per tonne of product for comparable potash processing facilities 16. Slide 33: 48: Jansen to emit ~0.025 tonne CO2e per tonne of product, about half the average emissions of Saskatchewan potash mines. Jansen will emit 10% less CO2e per tonne of product vs current best performer among Saskatchewan potash mines 17. Slide 38: 49 Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 18. Slide 40: 50 Based on data provided by BHP and compiled by PwC 19. Slides 40, 41: 43: 51: Aiming to achieve Indigenous workforce participation of 20% by the end of FY27. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 46Footnotes cont 1. Slide 21: 33: Majority of agreements are subject to non-disclose agreements. Agreements are typically with major buyers across South/Central America, South/South East Asia/China, and North America. By exception we have disclosed 2 agreements in China at the request of the counterparty (https://www.bhp.com/media-and-insights/news-releases/2019/11/bhp-grows-presence-at-2nd-china-international-import-expo/). 2. Slide 23: 34: Based on a Reserve life of 94 years as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com, with further optionality from Jansen's 5,230 Mt Measured Resource base 3. Slide 23: 35: For further information please refer to Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves, as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com and reported in 100 per cent terms. Competent Persons are B Nemeth (MAusIMM) and O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard (MAusIMM) for Ore Reserves. 4. Slide 24: 36: Figures on this slide refers to Jansen S1; Jansen S1 sustaining capex +/-20% on any given year. 5. Slide 24: 37 Jansen S1 production begins in CY27. Jansen S1 forecast to be first quartile when it reaches full production. 6. Slide 24: 38 Canada excludes Jansen. 7. Slide 25: 39: Jansen to emit ~0.025 tonne CO2e per tonne of product, about half the average emissions of Saskatchewan potash mines. 8. Slide 25: 40 Jansen's water usage to be 0.4 m3 for Stage 1 vs 1.7 m3 per tonne of product for comparable potash processing facilities 9. Slide 26: 41 Production numbers for peers reflect actual 2020 MOP production. 10. Slide 26: 42: Production target for Stage 1 is based on reported Ore Reserves. Potential incremental stages 2-4 are based on Measured Resources. Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are included in the news release published on 17th August 2021, available to view at www.bhp.com. 11. Slide 26: 43: Table reflects Jansen's proposed operation versus current operations at incumbent producers. Assumes full development of Jansen (Stages 1-4); Jansen capacity is equal to production. 12. Slide 27: 44: Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 13. Slide 30: 45: Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com and are reported in 100 per cent terms. Competent Persons are B Nemeth (MAusIMM) and O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard (MAusIMM) for Ore Reserves. 14. Slide 32: 46: Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 15. Slide 33: 47: Jansen's water usage is 5% less m3 per tonne of product than the current best performer amongst Saskatchewan potash mines. Jansen's water usage to be 0.4 m3 for Stage 1 vs 1.7 m3 per tonne of product for comparable potash processing facilities 16. Slide 33: 48: Jansen to emit ~0.025 tonne CO2e per tonne of product, about half the average emissions of Saskatchewan potash mines. Jansen will emit 10% less CO2e per tonne of product vs current best performer among Saskatchewan potash mines 17. Slide 38: 49 Project scope includes finishing the excavation and lining of the production and service shafts, and continuing the installation of essential surface infrastructure and utilities 18. Slide 40: 50 Based on data provided by BHP and compiled by PwC 19. Slides 40, 41: 43: 51: Aiming to achieve Indigenous workforce participation of 20% by the end of FY27. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 46

Jansen flow sheet Efficient mining system and advanced process control Large raw ore buffer; Single Bottleneck - dryers: Capacity of 1,750 tph industry leading utilisation have 20% additional capacity than needed Scrubbing and Flotation circuit Hoisting Raw ore storage de-slimingDe-watering and drying Mine Ore Raw ore handling Mining and crushing Sizing Four mining machines Throughput of needed vs 10-14 of peers Tails management Crystallisation plant 1,500 tph for equivalent throughput; Standard 1,216 tph; uptime of 35% Dry tailings: no damming or Recovers fine potash that product any large risks associated would traditionally be lost to with potash tailings tailings Standard product Compaction Product storage and railcar loading Granular product Loaded railcar to domestic Granular product distribution Domestic rail Loaded railcar Domestic market Port terminal Port rail unloading Port storage Ship loader Offshore market unloading to port Empty rail cars back to Jansen Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 47Jansen flow sheet Efficient mining system and advanced process control Large raw ore buffer; Single Bottleneck - dryers: Capacity of 1,750 tph industry leading utilisation have 20% additional capacity than needed Scrubbing and Flotation circuit Hoisting Raw ore storage de-slimingDe-watering and drying Mine Ore Raw ore handling Mining and crushing Sizing Four mining machines Throughput of needed vs 10-14 of peers Tails management Crystallisation plant 1,500 tph for equivalent throughput; Standard 1,216 tph; uptime of 35% Dry tailings: no damming or Recovers fine potash that product any large risks associated would traditionally be lost to with potash tailings tailings Standard product Compaction Product storage and railcar loading Granular product Loaded railcar to domestic Granular product distribution Domestic rail Loaded railcar Domestic market Port terminal Port rail unloading Port storage Ship loader Offshore market unloading to port Empty rail cars back to Jansen Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 47

Jansen Reserves and Resources Notes: • The information in this report relating to Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves is based on and fairly represents information and supporting documentation compiled by B Németh MAusIMM ), O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard ( MAusIMM ) for Ore Reserves. All Competent Persons are members of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy AusIMM ) or a 'Recognised Professional Organisation' (RPO) included in a list that is posted on the ASX and Joint Ore Reserves Committee websites. All Competent Persons are employees of BHP and have sufficient experience that is relevant t o t he style of mineralization, type of deposit under consideration and to the activity being undertaken to qualify as a Competent Persons as defined in the 2012 Edition of the 'Australasian Code for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves'. All Competent Persons confirm that they have no conflict of interest, perceived or otherwise, and consent to the inclusion in the report of the matters based on their information in the form and context in which it appears. • The Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources are inclusive of those Mineral Resources modified to produce the Ore Reserves. • Mineral Resources are stated for the Lower Patience Lake (LPL) potash unit. A seam thickness of 3.96 metres from the top of the 406 c lay seam was applied. • Measured Resources grade has been assigned to Inferred Resources. • 25.6 %K2O grade is equivalent to 40.5 %KCl content using the mineralogical conversion factor of • MgO % is used as a measure of carnallite (KCl.MgCl .6H O) content where per cent carnallite equivalent = % MgO x 6.8918. 2 2 • Tonnages are reported on an in situ moisture content basis, estimated to be 0.3%. • Tonnages are rounded to nearest 10 million tonnes. Note: for further detail please refer to Please refer to Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves are as reported in the 17 August 2021 news release, available to view on www.bhp.com and are reported in 100 per cent terms. Competent Persons are B Nemeth (MAusIMM) and O Turkekul (APEGS) for Mineral Resources, and J Sondergaard (MAusIMM) for Ore Reserves. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 48

Jansen Financial Modelling Operator and 3% crown royalty calculation = (K 0 tonnes produced) x 2 BHP, 100% interest ownership (average realised price) x (3% royalty rate) Royalty US$5.7 bn, C$7.5 bn 3% resource Surcharge = (Gross revenue + Capex Capex spend over six years - peak spend in FY25 transportation charged - transportation costs) x 3% and FY26 A base payment levied at a rate of 35% on the ~US$15/t (real) long term average; +/- 20% in any Sustaining capital producer's annual resource profits, subject to minimum given year payment of CAD$11.00 and a maximum of CAD$12.33 ~6 years construction timeframe per K O tonne sold. New producers may qualify for a First production / 2 base payment holiday for the first 10 years of production. Project delivery ~2 years ramp up from first production Volumes 4.35 Mtpa (Potassium chloride, KCL) A profit tax imposed on the producer's gross annual Potash profit tax determined by rates, which increase with profits ~100 years Mine life / Reserves Production Tax per tonne sold: 15% of the profit per tonne below CAD and resources 1.1 bt reserve 6.5 bt resource $71.36 and 35% of the profit per tonne above CAD $71.36 (tax brackets indexed for inflation). Profit tax is ~US$100/t FOB Vancouver assessed on a max of 35% of total tonnes sold, but • Mining: $19/t producers may claim a base payment credit with respect Unit costs • Processing: $26/t to amount of tonnes that are subject to both the base payment and the profit tax. No tax holidays available. • Port & Rail Freight: $36/t • Other: $19/t Federal and Combined top rate 27% (carried forward losses from pre- provincial production years can be utilised to decrease future Pink standard and pink granular MOP with a Product Grade corporate tax taxable profits). guaranteed minimum 60% K O 2 Withholding tax 5% Average Recovery ~92% Note: KCL is used interchangeably with MOP, fertiliser grade MOP is 95% KCL. The conversion from pure KCL to K 0 is 0.631. 2 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 49Jansen Financial Modelling Operator and 3% crown royalty calculation = (K 0 tonnes produced) x 2 BHP, 100% interest ownership (average realised price) x (3% royalty rate) Royalty US$5.7 bn, C$7.5 bn 3% resource Surcharge = (Gross revenue + Capex Capex spend over six years - peak spend in FY25 transportation charged - transportation costs) x 3% and FY26 A base payment levied at a rate of 35% on the ~US$15/t (real) long term average; +/- 20% in any Sustaining capital producer's annual resource profits, subject to minimum given year payment of CAD$11.00 and a maximum of CAD$12.33 ~6 years construction timeframe per K O tonne sold. New producers may qualify for a First production / 2 base payment holiday for the first 10 years of production. Project delivery ~2 years ramp up from first production Volumes 4.35 Mtpa (Potassium chloride, KCL) A profit tax imposed on the producer's gross annual Potash profit tax determined by rates, which increase with profits ~100 years Mine life / Reserves Production Tax per tonne sold: 15% of the profit per tonne below CAD and resources 1.1 bt reserve 6.5 bt resource $71.36 and 35% of the profit per tonne above CAD $71.36 (tax brackets indexed for inflation). Profit tax is ~US$100/t FOB Vancouver assessed on a max of 35% of total tonnes sold, but • Mining: $19/t producers may claim a base payment credit with respect Unit costs • Processing: $26/t to amount of tonnes that are subject to both the base payment and the profit tax. No tax holidays available. • Port & Rail Freight: $36/t • Other: $19/t Federal and Combined top rate 27% (carried forward losses from pre- provincial production years can be utilised to decrease future Pink standard and pink granular MOP with a Product Grade corporate tax taxable profits). guaranteed minimum 60% K O 2 Withholding tax 5% Average Recovery ~92% Note: KCL is used interchangeably with MOP, fertiliser grade MOP is 95% KCL. The conversion from pure KCL to K 0 is 0.631. 2 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 49

Tax system for potash industry in Canada Taxes Royalties Potash Production Tax Income Tax Withholding Tax Revenue Revenue Operating Costs Capital Costs 3. Base Payment 4. Profit Tax 5. Provincial 8. Canadian Deductions Deductions Deductions Income Tax Withholding Tax 3. Base Payment 6. Federal Income Tax 1. Crown 1. Crown Royalties Royalties 2. Resource 2. Resource Surcharge Surcharge 3. Base Payment Depreciation Head Office Allowance 4. Profit Tax Tax and royalty items 1. Crown Royalties 2. Resource 3. Base Payment 4. Profit Tax (net) 5. Provincial Income 6. Federal Income Tax 7. Canadian Surcharge Tax Withholding Tax Basis Revenue Revenue Profit Profit Profit Profit Dividends Rate 3% 3% CA$11-1215- 35% 12% 15% 5% Payee Provincial Provincial Provincial Provincial Provincial Federal Federal Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 50Tax system for potash industry in Canada Taxes Royalties Potash Production Tax Income Tax Withholding Tax Revenue Revenue Operating Costs Capital Costs 3. Base Payment 4. Profit Tax 5. Provincial 8. Canadian Deductions Deductions Deductions Income Tax Withholding Tax 3. Base Payment 6. Federal Income Tax 1. Crown 1. Crown Royalties Royalties 2. Resource 2. Resource Surcharge Surcharge 3. Base Payment Depreciation Head Office Allowance 4. Profit Tax Tax and royalty items 1. Crown Royalties 2. Resource 3. Base Payment 4. Profit Tax (net) 5. Provincial Income 6. Federal Income Tax 7. Canadian Surcharge Tax Withholding Tax Basis Revenue Revenue Profit Profit Profit Profit Dividends Rate 3% 3% CA$11-1215- 35% 12% 15% 5% Payee Provincial Provincial Provincial Provincial Provincial Federal Federal Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 50

Pricing realisation calculation Prices are influenced by grade and volume, but there are also (fluid) variations between prices in different regions US$/t MOP (quarterly average) • Most sales are made on a delivered basis (nominal) • Sales may be spot or contract Selling price 400 • Transacted prices are monitored by specialist Brazil CFR price-discovery services China CFR • Prices vary by product (e.g. standard/granular) US FOB w/house CFR Brazil 350 (granular, spot) CFR China (standard, contract) - 300 • Sellers may offer bilateral discounts, Discounts conditional or volume based rebates, and/or extended credit 250 - 200 Vancouver netback range Seaborne • For CFR sales, sellers arrange ocean freight freight either using spot or long-term charter 150 Realised FCA (Nutrien) - 100 Port costs and Realised price = inland freight FOB mine Th FOere B Mis inno e single 'potash price': for example, this chart shows a 5-yr history of Nutrien's realised price (FCA, offshore sales only) against benchmarks reported by CRU Fertilizer Week Data: CRU Fertilizer Week; Nutrien. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 51 Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Q4 2018 Q1 2019 Q2 2019 Q3 2019 Q4 2019 Q1 2020 Q2 2020 Q3 2020 Q4 2020 Q1 2021 Q2 2021Pricing realisation calculation Prices are influenced by grade and volume, but there are also (fluid) variations between prices in different regions US$/t MOP (quarterly average) • Most sales are made on a delivered basis (nominal) • Sales may be spot or contract Selling price 400 • Transacted prices are monitored by specialist Brazil CFR price-discovery services China CFR • Prices vary by product (e.g. standard/granular) US FOB w/house CFR Brazil 350 (granular, spot) CFR China (standard, contract) - 300 • Sellers may offer bilateral discounts, Discounts conditional or volume based rebates, and/or extended credit 250 - 200 Vancouver netback range Seaborne • For CFR sales, sellers arrange ocean freight freight either using spot or long-term charter 150 Realised FCA (Nutrien) - 100 Port costs and Realised price = inland freight FOB mine Th FOere B Mis inno e single 'potash price': for example, this chart shows a 5-yr history of Nutrien's realised price (FCA, offshore sales only) against benchmarks reported by CRU Fertilizer Week Data: CRU Fertilizer Week; Nutrien. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 51 Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018 Q3 2018 Q4 2018 Q1 2019 Q2 2019 Q3 2019 Q4 2019 Q1 2020 Q2 2020 Q3 2020 Q4 2020 Q1 2021 Q2 2021

Potash demand outlook to 2030 by region Soil depletion a global phenomenon, underscoring our belief that IoU is likely to rise across multiple regions Additional tonnes 2020-2030 NORTH AMERICA EUROPE & CIS ASIA & OCEANIA 1 1 1 Historical demand growth 0.2% Historical demand growth 4.3% Historical demand growth 0.2% 2 2 2 BHP forecast growth 1-3% BHP forecast growth 1-4% BHP forecast growth 1-3% 3 3 3 External forecast growth 2.0% External forecast growth 1.7% External forecast growth 1.1% 4 4 4 Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor 5 5 5 Potash contribution to K uptake 30-35%, Potash contribution to K uptake 20-25%, Potash contribution to K uptake 30-35%, recently improving stable improving CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA AFRICA WORLD 1 1 Historical demand growth 4.4% Historical demand growth 6.1% 1 2 2 Historical demand growth 2.7% BHP forecast growth 2-4% BHP forecast growth 5-10% 3 3 External forecast growth 2.9% External forecast growth 2.9% 2 BHP forecast growth 1-3% 4 4 Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating 5 5 Potash contribution to K uptake 35-40%, Potash contribution to K uptake~5%, 3 External forecast growth 2.0% stable improving 1. Average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2000-01 to 2019-20 (CRU). 2. Forecast average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2019-20 to 2030 (BHP range). 3. Forecast average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2019-20 to 2030 (Argus; CRU; IHS). 4. Status of the World's Soil Resources (FAO and ITPS, 2015). 5. BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 52Potash demand outlook to 2030 by region Soil depletion a global phenomenon, underscoring our belief that IoU is likely to rise across multiple regions Additional tonnes 2020-2030 NORTH AMERICA EUROPE & CIS ASIA & OCEANIA 1 1 1 Historical demand growth 0.2% Historical demand growth 4.3% Historical demand growth 0.2% 2 2 2 BHP forecast growth 1-3% BHP forecast growth 1-4% BHP forecast growth 1-3% 3 3 3 External forecast growth 2.0% External forecast growth 1.7% External forecast growth 1.1% 4 4 4 Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor 5 5 5 Potash contribution to K uptake 30-35%, Potash contribution to K uptake 20-25%, Potash contribution to K uptake 30-35%, recently improving stable improving CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA AFRICA WORLD 1 1 Historical demand growth 4.4% Historical demand growth 6.1% 1 2 2 Historical demand growth 2.7% BHP forecast growth 2-4% BHP forecast growth 5-10% 3 3 External forecast growth 2.9% External forecast growth 2.9% 2 BHP forecast growth 1-3% 4 4 Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating Soil nutrient imbalance Poor, deteriorating 5 5 Potash contribution to K uptake 35-40%, Potash contribution to K uptake~5%, 3 External forecast growth 2.0% stable improving 1. Average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2000-01 to 2019-20 (CRU). 2. Forecast average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2019-20 to 2030 (BHP range). 3. Forecast average growth per annum of MOP shipments 2019-20 to 2030 (Argus; CRU; IHS). 4. Status of the World's Soil Resources (FAO and ITPS, 2015). 5. BHP analysis based on multiple sources. Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 52

Potash is a low emission, biosphere friendly fertiliser MOP is a critical nutrient with a modest GHG and broader environmental footprint GHG emissions intensities inform our investment decisions: Not all fertilisers have the same environmental footprint: Scope 1+2â-º Low Medium High 1 â-¼Scope 3 <100 kg CO e/t <1,000 kg CO e/t >1,000 kg CO e/t 2 2 2 Potash doesn't have high emissions in production Low 2ü potash <100 kg CO e/t 2 or distribution ü Potash doesn't release CO or N O 2 2 3 phosphate Medium Potash doesn't pollute waterways ü 4 High nitrogen >1,000 kg CO e/t 2 1. Scope 3 impact relates only to emissions associated with downstream processing and use, not other considerations such as transportation. 2. Based on MOP produced by flotation and without downstream processing. 3. Based on ammonium phosphates (DAP/MAP). 4. Based on urea. Note: a) Scope 1+2 emissions for flotation-based MOP 50-80 kg CO2e/t, other production routes are 100-500kg. High nutrient concentration (60% K2O) maximises efficiency in transportation and spreading. b) From BHP research conducted so far, nitrogen-based fertilisers rather than potash appear to have a larger downstream emissions impact. However, trying to estimate the GHG contribution impact of fertiliser on soils and crops is very complicated. We continue to develop and improve our knowledge in this area. 5. Crippa, M., Solazzo, E., Guizzardi, D. et al. Food systems are responsible for a third of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Nat Food 2, 198-209 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00225-9 Jansen briefing 15 September 2021 53

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