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Abbott Laboratories : Patent Issued for Systems for Anchoring a Medical Device in a Body Lumen (USPTO 9889276)

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02/23/2018 | 11:12 pm

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Pharma Business Week -- From Alexandria, Virginia, NewsRx journalists report that a patent by the inventor Voss, Laveille Kao (Belmont, CA), filed on March 31, 2015, was published online on February 13, 2018 (see also Abbott Laboratories).

The patent's assignee for patent number 9889276 is Abbott Laboratories (Abbott Park, IL).

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present invention relates in general to systems for anchoring medical devices in body lumens, or body cavities. In particular, the present invention relates to systems for anchoring catheters in body lumens, which may include blood vessels.

"Various medical procedures require the anchoring of a medical device within a body lumen. All of these systems need to be designed so that the device can be removed at the end of the procedure without causing unacceptable amounts tissue damage. For example, in the case of a catheter anchored in a blood vessel, the catheter must be easily inserted through an opening in the side of the vessel yet also be easily anchored when positioned at its desired location in the vessel.

"A variety of systems have been designed to anchor a catheter passing into a body lumen through an opening in the side of the body lumen. Most commonly, an inflatable balloon is mounted on the catheter. After the catheter has been positioned at a desired location, the balloon is inflated. The balloon thereby pushes against the walls of the body lumen adjacent to the side opening when the catheter is pulled back, thus holding the catheter in position. Unfortunately, a problem with using such an inflatable balloon is that it typically blocks fluid flow through the lumen, which may not be desirable. Also, in addition to inhibiting fluid circulation, the balloon may interfere with drug delivery systems in the catheter.

"What is instead desired is a simple system for securing a medical device such as a catheter in a body lumen. Such a system would preferably not interfere with fluid flow through the body lumen (such as blocking fluid flow with an inflatable balloon). In addition, such an anchoring system would preferably be easily removable at the end of the medical procedure."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent, NewsRx correspondents also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent: "The present invention provides a versatile system for securing a medical device (such as a catheter) at preferred locations within a body lumen (such as a blood vessel) without blocking or substantially inhibiting fluid flow through the lumen.

"In preferred embodiments, the present invention includes a sheath having a plurality of side openings; a rotatable element disposed within the sheath; and a plurality of curved projections extending from the rotatable element, wherein rotation of the rotatable element with respect to the sheath pushes distal ends of each of the curved projections outwardly through one of the plurality of openings. In preferred methods of use, the plurality of curved projections are extended outwardly from the rotatable element and are then used to brace against the tissue surrounding a side hole opening into the vessel. Thus, when the device is deployed within the body lumen, and then pulled back (ie: proximally), the curved projections contact the tissue surrounding the side opening into the vessel, thereby preventing the device from being removed. The deployed projections may also provide needle receiving locations in the case of a suturing device, such as a device for suturing an arteriotomy.

"The present invention also includes an embodiment including a sheath having only one side opening with one curved projection extending from the rotatable element. Similar to the above design, rotation of the rotatable element with respect to the sheath pushes the distal end of the curved projection outwardly through the side opening. In this embodiment, the curved projection may be a wire having one end attached to the rotatable element.

"In optional preferred embodiments, the curved projection(s) may be biased to spring radially outwardly as they pass through the side opening(s) in the sheath. Alternatively, or in addition, the curved projection(s) may be formed from a shape memory material which assists them in springing radially outwards as they pass through the side opening(s) in the sheath.

"In various embodiments, the curved projection(s) may either be attached to the rotatable element, or they may be integrally formed into the rotatable element.

"In various preferred embodiments, the curved projections are opposite ends of a deformable element such as a wire or ribbon. Most preferably, such deformable element passes through (or is fitted around) the central rotatable element.

"The present invention also provides a method of anchoring a device in a body lumen or cavity, including inserting the device into the body lumen or cavity, and rotating the rotatable element with respect to the sheath, thereby causing the distal ends of each of the curved projections to move outwardly through one of the one or more openings and into the body lumen or cavity. In preferred embodiments of the present method, the body lumen may be any blood vessel."

For additional information on this patent, see: Voss, Laveille Kao. Systems for Anchoring a Medical Device in a Body Lumen. U.S. Patent Number 9889276, filed March 31, 2015, and published online on February 13, 2018. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=9889276.PN.&OS=PN/9889276RS=PN/9889276

Keywords for this news article include: Pharmaceutical Companies, Business, Medical Devices, Abbott Laboratories, Health and Medicine, Healthcare Companies.

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